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Microsoft Project Server 2010 is built on Microsoft SharePoint® Server 2010, and brings together powerful business collaboration platform services with structured execution capabilities to provide flexible work management solutions. Project Server 2010 unifies project and portfolio management to help organizations align resources and investments with strategic priorities, gain control across all types of work, and visualize performance by using powerful dashboards.

1. Unified project and portfolio management.


2. Drive accountability and control with governance workflow.


3. Standardize and streamline project initiation.


4. Select the right portfolios that align with strategy.


5. Easily build Web-based project schedules.


6. Intuitively submit time and task updates.


7. Gain visibility and control through reports and dashboards.


8. Simplified administration and flexibility.


9. Gain additional value from the Microsoft platform.


10. Extensible and programmable platform.

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Governance planning is even more important in SharePoint Server 2010 because the increased emphasis and availability of social computing features means that there are more types of content to govern. In addition, because SharePoint Server 2010 offers new capabilities to manage metadata at the enterprise level, you will need to consider the addition of a new organizational role that plans and monitors metadata attributes across your organization. So, even if you have already defined a well-documented governance plan for your SharePoint Server 2007 environment, you will need to adapt your plan to incorporate the SharePoint Server 2010 features that you plan to deploy. We’ll discuss these areas in more detail later in the white paper, but here are some of the governance areas that are new to SharePoint Server 2010:
  • SharePoint Server 2010 offers users a far more participatory role in the solution information architecture through the use of “social data” such as tags, bookmarks and ratings. Users need to understand and internalize the value proposition for leveraging these features. Solution designers will likely need to provide both guidance and encouragement for their use.
  • SharePoint Server 2010 introduces new capabilities for sharing metadata across multiple site collections and even server farms which require planning and control. You will need to consider the addition of a new role (or at least a new responsibility to an existing role) to manage and maintain the dictionary of shared metadata.
  • SharePoint Server 2010 includes new and more user-friendly records management capabilities such as the ability to declare a record “in place.” While many organizations have records management plans and policies for their SharePoint Server 2007 implementations, enforcing and acting on these plans has not been consistent. The new records management capabilities introduce an opportunity to create and enforce your records management plan.
  • SharePoint Server 2010 offers many more opportunities for users to customize their sites with easy-to-apply themes, create custom designs with Microsoft® SharePoint® Designer, and use sandboxed solutions to create custom solutions. Your Governance Plan now needs to include decisions regarding how, where, and when to allow configuration by using these expanded capabilities.
  • SharePoint Server 2010 does a better job of handling lists with large amounts of data. However, there is still a need to ensure that users understand the kind and quantity of information that they should store in SharePoint Server. Through a new feature, SharePoint Server 2010 can automatically restrict user queries of large lists by using Resource Throttling. This is a policy setting and should be considered when defining a plan for overall governance because it can impact overall usability of the system.
  • SharePoint Server 2010 can also assist in partitioning large amounts of data through a feature called the Content Organizer. Through the content organizer, documents can be routed into folders and libraries based on metadata and other factors. The downside is that users may not understand where their document landed and should be addressed in the overall plan for data management.
  • Finally, SharePoint Server 2010 introduces a feature called sandboxed solutions, which enables the site collection administrator to directly upload customization elements such as Web Parts. Within your governance plan, you should have a customization policies section that describes how you will deal with the numerous ways to create solutions that customize SharePoint Server.
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Demand Management is about capturing all work proposals in one single place, taking these proposals through a multi-stage governance process, making decisions on which proposals to approve and tracking progress on their execution until the work is completed. A key component within Demand Management is the Workflow governance model we have now implemented within Microsoft Project Server 2010.

The "Proposals" feature in Microsoft Office Project Server 2007 helps capture demand in one place, but is not flexible enough and does not have a full-fledged governance workflow behind it. The "Builder" module in Project Portfolio Server 2007 is a flexible demand management paradigm, but does not have a familiar Project Server/Office SharePoint Server look and feel and also has some usability, scalability problems. The Demand management functionality in Microsoft Project Server 2010 is designed to be both flexible and usable.

In project portfolio management (PPM), a project lifecycle is a long-running process that spans various governance phases. Typical demand management phases are create, select, plan, and manage (customers can create their own).

The "Plan" phase is accomplished by the more familiar project management processes using Project Professional and Project Web Access. Workflow models the governance processes and provides a structured way for projects to proceed through the phases. Workflows, along with other key concepts, are captured and integrated within the demand management feature set, providing a rich and dynamic platform on which customers and partners can build custom solutions.

The figure below shows the four typical phases of demand management and how they fit together. Within each phase are stages such as propose idea and initial review. Each stage can have an associated project detail page (PDP) in Project Web Access (PWA). The entire collection of stages represents a single workflow that can be linked to an enterprise project template (EPT). More details about these concepts given below.


Governance Workflow

A governance workflow is all about creating a rich life cycle for any proposal/demand that comes into the system. It includes defining the various stages through which the project goes in its lifecycle (for example, Proposal Creation, Proposal Initial Approval, etc), determining what information is required or locked at what stage (for example, budget cost should be locked down after the project is approved), including any manual approval/notifications steps as necessary and adding any business logic to update other Line Of Business Systems (for example, update the SAP system when the proposal budget gets approved).

The Project Server workflow platform is built on the Windows SharePoint Services 2010 workflow platform, which in turn is based on the Windows Workflow Foundation. Workflow is a key component of demand management.
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